Curator’s Corner: Blog Post #1 Welcome to My Blog!

As I survey the New York City cultural movie scene, numerous events prompt memories from innumerable work projects and special moments throughout my career.  The launch of this “Curator’s Corner” space is meant as a more free-form way for me to write about such memories.  For those of you unfamiliar with my professional background, let’s begin with my career biography, here:  https://www.gartenbergmedia.com/about/jon-gartenberg-profile

16mm Format Experimental and Independent Films:

The photograph below symbolizes my extensive work in archiving, preserving, and programming the work of experimental and independent filmmakers, who preferred format of production was in 16mm celluloid.  This includes projects restoring the films of Andy Warhol -- https://www.gartenbergmedia.com/programming-currating#andy-warhol-- as well as those of experimental artist Warren Sonbert -- https://www.gartenbergmedia.com/programming-currating#warren-sonbert-retrospective

L. Curator Jon Gartenberg holding a 16mm film reel, seated in front of an abstract painting. R. Warren Sonbert, filming with his Bolex camera

35mm Fiction and Documentary Motion Picture Films:

 Another thread of my work has involved rescuing from extinction commercial films produced on 35mm celluloid, as exemplified from the photograph below.

L. Jon Gartenberg in film vaults, preparing boxes containing reels of 35mm celluloid films that were acquired by the Packard Humanities Institute for long-term storage and exhibition. See article, here: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52afa15ce4b042c7f0089b22/t/54c3f8d6e4b03dfa2a2f471a/1422129366829/San-Jose-Mercury-News.pdf

R. Photograph of nitrate reels of DAREDEVILS OF EARTH, a.k.a. MONEY FOR SPEED(1933, Great Britain), directed by Bernhard Vorhaus, edited by David Lean, and starring a 15-year old Ida Lupino. (Lean can also be seen playing a reporter in the commentary box in the race scenes

In 1992, Money for Speed was included in the BFI's Missing Believed Lost project (edited by David Meeker), a list of 100 lost British feature films that it was hoped could somehow be recovered. Eventually two prints were found, one dubbed into French and the other with German subtitles. Subsequent to this, we identified in abandoned warehouse storage multiple vintage US distribution prints that appear to constitute the best quality material recovered on a global basis.